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All of the photos on todays main post were taken on a boat tour only yesterday!

Tim describes how a puffins bill works to catch fish to the visitors

Tim describes how a puffins bill works to catch fish to the visitors

At the beginning of this past fortnight I asked you a set of questions in the first Daily Digest. These questions were:

  1. How big are Alderney and Burhou?
  2. How many people live on Alderney at different times of the year?
  3. Which seabirds are the focus of our LIVE cameras this year?
  4. How is Alderney different to where you live? Write us a short comparison between Alderney and your home town?
  5. Apart from seabirds, what animal is Alderney most famous for?
A boat tour is a great time to take photos of the puffins

A boat tour is a great time to take photos of the puffins

The answers were spread through the Daily Digests across the past fortnight, here are the answers:

  1. Alderney is 3 miles long and 1.5 miles wide. Burhou is just 1 mile long.
  2. Alderney has a regular population of 1,800 people, but 4,000 in the summer.
  3. Puffins are the main focus of our cameras.
  4. Please put your answers in the comments below.
  5. Alderney's most famous animal, after seabirds, is the blonde hedgehog.

I hope you enjoyed looking for, and finding, the answers to my questions. Next Monday will see the start of a new topic and a new set of questions for you to answer.

Aurelie really enjoyed her time out on the boat spotting our seabirds

Aurelie really enjoyed her time out on the boat spotting our seabirds

ECOLOGIST'S UPDATE

On Thursday and Friday Aurelie, Mel and Tim are out mapping the intertidal habitat of Clonque Bay. This means we go along the bay when the tide is at its lowest so that we can see most of the habitat that the retreating sea reveals. We then identify what are the main species in areas of the rocks and intertidal pools and use these to map out all the different areas of the habitat for our records.

Mel and Aurelie identify what species are present and discuss how to describe them

Mel and Aurelie identify what species are present and discuss how to describe them

By doing these surveys not only do we better understand what is in our marine habitats but we can also monitor changes over time by doing the surveys again in the future.