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Read by

Charley and Dave

This coming week will focus on the food chains section of our course.

A lapwing finds a worm in the soil

A lapwing finds a worm in the soil

But it is only one week, instead of the usual two, because next week you are all very lucky and get a week off school!

Then when you come back to school you will have two weeks learning from the Birds on the Edge team at the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust in Jersey. I have been to Durrell myself a couple of times and seen some of the work they do, so I know you will all enjoy learning about their work with Choughs and other species around the world. But don’t worry, we will keep you fully updated on the puffins and gannets during this time as well!

Red-billed chough

Red-billed chough

When we come back to the seabirds full-time it will be the 16th June and we will be doing one week on the topic of life-cycles. So the questions today will be related to this week of food chains and the upcoming week of life cycles. I will remind you all of these questions on the 16th June so don’t worry if you can’t answer them all after this week.

A hoopoe, a rare migrant to Alderney and the UK, feeds on a grub

A hoopoe, a rare migrant to Alderney and the UK, feeds on a grub

Here are your questions for food chains and life cycles:

  1. What is a puffins favourite prey?
  2. Lesser black-backed gulls do not eat puffins, so why do they chase them?
  3. Which land predators of seabirds does Alderney have, and which does it not have?
  4. Why do seabirds migrate?
Some maths questions for you:
  1. How much longer do fulmars incubate compared to ringed plovers?
  2. How much longer do gannet chicks take to fledge compared to shags?
  3. If a lesser black-backed gull hatches on the 11th June, when will it fledge?

ECOLOGIST'S UPDATE

This weekend a check on our ringed plovers revealed that both adults are still doing a good job looking after their chicks as both little ones are still running around Platte Saline. Whilst watching our breeding population we also saw a migratory group of ringed plovers and two other wader species'; dunlin and sanderling. Like plovers, dunlin and sanderling nest in scrapes on the ground. However, they do not breed on Alderney and this group of 23 plovers/dunlin/sanderling will be on their way to breeding grounds in the UK or visiting from France. They are all small, quick birds but you can make out the group in this photo.

Ringed plovers, dunlin and sanderling on Platte Saline

Ringed plovers, dunlin and sanderling on Platte Saline